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What Does Fabric Denier Mean

Feb 27, 2019

When picking a fabric, there are many considerations to take in.  When you’re looking at fabric and you may see “70d” labeled on it, what does that mean? Well, the “d” stands for denier.

A denier is a unit of measurement that expresses fiber thickness of individual threads or filaments in fabric or textiles. This is done by using a single strand of silk as a reference for one denier where 9000m of the strand would equal one gram.

Standard fabrics are typically between 40d and 80d. Heavy duty fabric — used for backpacks and tents — can be between 100d and 600d. A fiber with a denier of less than one is considered a microfiber.

Denier is a unit of measurement that is used to determine the fiber thickness of individual threads or filaments used in the creation of textiles and fabrics. Fabrics with a high denier count tend to be thick, sturdy, and durable. Fabrics with a low denier count tend to be sheer, soft, and silky.


In terms of fills, in order to be considered a “microfiber” the fiber must be less than 1 denier, which is extremely fine. This gives the fill its airy weight, downy feel, and soft, silky texture. In comparison, a human hair is 20 denier, whereas Standard Fiber’s microfibers are typically 0.9 denier or less.